Working on Transition Readiness

A recent study (Gray WN, et al. Inflamm Bowel Dis 2015; 21: 1125-31) examines preparedness of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on the verge of transitioning to adult gastroenterologists from pediatric gastroenterologists.

Using a population of 195 patients (16-25 years), the authors used the Transition Readiness Assessment Questionnaire (TRAQ).  Scoring system:

  • 5= Yes, I always do this when I need to
  • 4= Yes, I have started doing this
  • 3= No, but I am learning to do this
  • 2= No, but I want to learn
  • 1= No, I do not know how

Specific Readiness Skills & Mean Scores (more complete data listed in Table 3):

  • Taking medicines correctly and on own 4.66
  • Arranging for ride to medical appointment 4.39
  • Managing money and budgeting 3.69
  • Calling doctor about unusual change in health 3.64
  • Reordering and getting refills on time 3.60
  • Calling doctor’s office to schedule an appointment 3.09
  • Getting financial help with school or work 2.92
  • Knowing what health insurance covers 2.60
  • Applying for health insurance if coverage lost 2.44

Key finding: “Only 5.6% older adolescents/young adults …met our institutional benchmark.”

To help with transition readiness the authors recommend the CDHNF/NASPGHAN Transition Checklist for parents and starting on transition issues between 12-15 years of age.  Transition checklist available here: Transitioning a Patient With IBD From Pediatric to Adult Care –this is a simple 2-page handout!

Conclusion: Most patients need more work on transition readiness.  If patients are not prepared, it is more likely that this will lead to medical setbacks.

Briefly noted:

“Exercise Decreases Risk of Future Active Disease in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission” Inflammatory Bowel Dis 2015; 21: 1063-71. This prospective study used the CCFA’s Partners’ internet-based cohort. 227 of 1308 (17.4%) Crohn’s disease (CD) patients and 135 of 549 (24.6%) Ulcerative colitis/indeterminate colitis (UC/IC) patients developed active disease after 6 months.  Key finding: Higher exercise level was associated with decreased risk of active disease for CD (adjusted relative risk 0.72) and UC/IC (adjusted relative risk 0.78).  Take-home point: While there are several limitations to this study, it does seem likely that regular physical exercise is a good idea (not just in patients with IBD).  In this population, subjective markers of disease activity (sCDAI and SCCAI) improved in those who exercised more.

Zoo Atlanta

Zoo Atlanta

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