Better Discharge Planning Needed

An interesting commentary in NY Times: Most Dangerous Time at the Hospital? May be When You Leave

An excerpt:

One-fifth of Medicare beneficiaries are readmitted within 30 days of discharge, and one-third are readmitted within 90 days. One studyfound that 20 percent of patients have a complication within three weeks of leaving the hospital — more than half of which could have been prevented or ameliorated. Thankfully most complications are minor, but some can be serious, leading to permanent disability or death. All told, Medicare spends $26 billion annually on readmissions, $17 billion of which is for readmissions that are considered preventable…

there’s often a rush toward the end of hospitalization — when a patient wants to leave or a rehab bed opens up — leading to a haphazard set of final conversations, appointments and prescriptions. And because the exact time of discharge is uncertain, the doctor discharging a patient may not be the one who knows the patient best.

It’s also often not clear exactly when a patient should be discharged….

the remaining diagnostics and treatments are often completed after discharge. But this is where we struggle most. Research suggests direct communication between hospital doctors and primary care doctorsoccurs infrequently and that discharge summaries — detailed records of a patient’s hospital course — are often unavailable at a patient’s first post-hospital visit. Almost 30 percent of patients are discharged with a plan to continue workups after hospitalization, but more than one-third of these are never completed. Similarly, more than 40 percent of patients have lab tests pending at the time of discharge — with 10 percent requiring action—but most physicians remain unaware of them.

My take: This is indeed an area where checklists and attention should be focused.  My top three:

  • Making sure a list of discharged medications is compared to admission medications
  • Identifying outstanding tests and arranging followup workup
  • Direct communication with outpatient physician(s)
Gibbs Gardens

Gibbs Gardens

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One thought on “Better Discharge Planning Needed

  1. Pingback: The Indispensable Physician | gutsandgrowth

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