Endoscopic Surveillance after Esophageal Atresia: Low Yield In Pediatrics

A recent study of patients who had undergone repair of esophageal atresia (Koivusalo et al. JPGN 2016; 62: 562-66) confirms that “routine endoscopic surveillance had limited benefit and seems unnecessary” before 15 years of age.

A retrospective review of pediatric patients with esophageal atresia (EA) from 1980-2014) identified 209 patients with 616 biopsies.  60 patients had undergone antireflux surgery. Key findings:

  • Gr I esophagitis was noted in 37%, Gr II or III in 16%.
  • Gastric metaplasia was found in 17% and reached a prevalence of 15% by age 15 years.
  • Only 9% of patients with gastric metaplasia and 32% of patients with gr II esophagitis were symptomatic.
  • No cases of dysplasia or cancer were identified.

My take: Conditions, including esophageal atresia, that predisposed to chronic reflux esophagitis increase the risk of esophageal malignancy; however, this risk remains very low in childhood.  Therefore, surveillance for asymptomatic children is not needed prior to age 15 years.

Related blog postNever quite right | gutsandgrowth

Vik Muniz recreation of Mary Cassatt painting

Vik Muniz recreation of Mary Cassatt painting

Up close, one sees this painting is actually a collage of images

Up close, one sees this painting is actually a collage of images

Disclaimer: These blog posts are for educational purposes only. Specific dosing of medications/diets (along with potential adverse effects) should be confirmed by prescribing physician/nutritionist.  This content is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a condition.

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One thought on “Endoscopic Surveillance after Esophageal Atresia: Low Yield In Pediatrics

  1. Pingback: Guidelines for Esophageal Atresia-Tracheoesophageal Fistula | gutsandgrowth

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