Bring Out the Big Guns: Treating Infections with Cirrhosis

A recent study (M Merli et al. Hepatology 2016; 1632-39) indicates that health-care associated infections (HCA) in the setting of cirrhosis respond more favorably to broad-spectrum antibiotics.  In this prospective study of 96 randomized patients, in-hospital mortality was improved in the broad-spectrum group (6%) compared to the standard group (25%).  There was a similar multidrug-resistnace rate (50% broad spectrum compared with 60% in standard group).

Table 1 lists the antibiotic selection.  In the broad spectrum treatment, this almost always included imipenem/cilastin (I/C); with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), I/C was combined with vancomycin, and with pneumonia it was combined with both vancomycin and azithromycin.  In contrast, the standard group’s main medication was augmentin (with added azithromycin for pneumonia) or cefotaxime for SBP.

My take: Does this study show that infections in the setting of cirrhosis are becoming more difficult to treat? Probably. How much these findings can be extended to the pediatric population remains uncertain.

Somewhat related topic: Primary prophylaxis of Variceal Bleeding in Children –Summary of the Baveno VI Pediatric Satellite Symposium.  BL Shneider et al. Hepatology 2016; 63: 1368-80. Key point: “there are few pediatric data…therefore, no recommendations for primary prophylaxis with endoscopic variceal ligation, sclerotherapy, or nonspecific beta-blockade in children was proposed.”

Silver Comet Trail

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One thought on “Bring Out the Big Guns: Treating Infections with Cirrhosis

  1. Pingback: March 2017 Briefs | gutsandgrowth

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