Raynaud’s Phenomenon

IN 1862, Maurice Raynaud described a 26-year-old female patient: “Under the influence of a very moderate cold…she sees her fingers become ex-sanguine, completely insensible, and of a whitish-yellow color.  This phenomenon …lasts a variable time, and terminates by a period of very painful reaction, during which the circulation is re-established…and recurs to the normal state.”

An updated review on Raynaud’s: FM Wigley, NA Flavahan. NEJM 2016; 375: 556-65.

This review highlights treatments and the differential diagnosis of primary Raynaud’s phenomenon form secondary causes (eg scleroderma, SLE, dermatomyositis, Sjogren’s and others).

A) Pallor phase B) Cyanotic phase C) Normal nailfold capillaries (primary phenomenon) D) Abnormal nailfold capillaries typical of microvascular disease

A) Pallor phase B) Cyanotic phase C) Normal nailfold capillaries (primary phenomenon) D) Abnormal nailfold capillaries typical of microvascular disease

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